Evaluation and Graphic Recording together for social justice

What if evaluation methodologies were about transformational systems change, and deepening social justice? An article in the free, new e-Anthology from the Developmental Evaluation Institute (DEI) features graphic facilitation as a tool for developmental evaluation.

Written by Trilby Smith and Natalie Ord from the Vancouver Foundation and the Fostering Change Initiative, Trilby and Natalie shared their experiences using graphic recording for developmental evaluation. 

It was an opportunity for me to reflect on how graphic recording can inspire action. Some of my thoughts: 

“Art can inspire action. Fostering Change uses policy, youth-led engagement and art, including graphic recording, for social change. By listening and drawing, graphic recording humanizes evaluation tools, engagement and research. We can show participant voices, statistics, and visualize together the system-wide change that’s needed.

In this image, when youth say foster kid stories shouldn’t be exploited, but personal stories can put pressure on the system, the Youth Advisory Committee is describing a balance of qualitative and quantitative approaches. That’s also how graphic recording operates. Additionally, the power of graphic recording comes from helping people see that they’ve been heard. And, because it’s done live, we can be in a relationship with the speakers to ensure we’re capturing things with transparency and integrity. Advocacy work shouldn’t be extractive: as the YAC says, this work can honour your whole self.”  

 

Download the anthology for free here.  

The DEI “provides pathways for new, emerging, and mid-career evaluators to develop skills in developmental evaluation for social justice.” Three graphic recording images are featured, including by Tiaré Jung (below), and Corrina Keeling. The anthology is great and highly encourage people to download it.