Graphic Recording for Building Indigenous Energy Self-Determination Across Distant & Remote Communities

Today’s blog post is from graphic recorder Tiaré Jung. Thanks for sharing your reflections, Tiaré!  

“2019 marked my 3rd year working as a graphic recorder – and I wanted to highlight a project from the past 50+ amazing collaborations across Canada on Indigenous land. Here’s a reflection on how graphic recording visuals can bring so much to different types of gatherings, especially large conferences that bring together distant and/or remote communities to build relationships and capacity. 

A key question I’m often asking myself as I listen is, “how can the images reflect the spirit and humanity at the core of the work and sustain that energy beyond our gathering?”

IESO First Nations Energy Symposium – 2 day conference – Toronto (2019)

Joining the IESO for the 3rd annual First Nations Energy Symposium felt like coming home to a team. Has it been a year already? So many old friends. What’s changed since we last talked? I asked for the update on the phone before getting in front of the drawing board. Back in 2017, new funding was available to First Nations across Ontario to determine their energy futures. The IESO gathered First Nations in a 2 day symposium with 500+ attendees to share resources and ask “how can we support your energy sovereignty?” 

  • Tip: look for a graphic recorder who wants to have phone calls with you ahead of time, to best understand the day

A break out workshop hosted by Fort Severn First Nation was an example of what’s possible for remote communities. In Chief Paul Burke’s words, “We’ve dealt with everything from politics to polar bears.” By focusing on relationships, they were able to resurrect a project from what seemed like certain failure. 

When I’m graphic recording, I’m thinking “what do people in the room need?”

When I understand that the purpose of this one hour workshop is not a manual on how to build a 300KW off-grid solar farm – the purpose is to illustrate what’s possible when we reach out for help and tend to our relationships – the drawing flows. I’ve been privileged over the past 3 years to draw for Indigenous communities across Canada in community capacity building and Comprehensive Community Planning (CCP). 

A key question I’m often asking myself as I listen is, “how can the images reflect the spirit and humanity at the core of the work and sustain that energy beyond our gathering?” We value that graphic recording brings value to people in the room – and to people after the session, for example when they are included in reports.”

  • Tip: When preparing your graphic recorder for the event, share what you hope participants will feel and will have changed for them after having attended this event 

You can download the full report at this link and see graphic recordings from the 2019 First Nations Energy Symposium: http://www.ieso.ca/en/Get-Involved/Indigenous-Relations/2019-First-Nations-Energy-Symposium 

Thanks Tiaré for sharing these insights! 

Tiaré Jung

About Tiaré Lani Kela Jung:

Tiaré Jung is of Hawaiian, Tahitian, Irish, and Chinese descent, raised in Lheidli T’enneh territory. Graphic recording since 2016, Tiaré draws upon a skill set of facilitation, illustration, and design (Capilano University). Tiaré brings learning from years of family and community care work into how they show up as a graphic recorder.

Get in touch with us for graphic recording at hello@drawingchange.com.