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graphic recording tiare jung drawing change for cbc radio food bank forum

Guest post: Tiare Jung for Drawing Change

Today, I’m thrilled to bring you a guest post by emerging graphic recorder Tiaré Jung. Tiaré has been working on fantastic projects with Drawing Change this year. Enjoy these insights into graphic recording as a tool for change! – Sam

Tiaré Jung

In 2016, I was thrilled to begin working with Drawing Change as a graphic recorder, with Sam Bradd as my mentor. I have worked as a facilitator and graphic artist for 7+ years and it is exciting to combine these skills to offer a dynamic tool.

In this guest post, I will share a few samples about how I use graphic recording: I make images that draw connections between people and ideas. I’ve noticed that reflecting group processes, right in front of people, enables individuals to better build off the group energy and feel excited about the impact of their work. I also like to work with clients to create images for their meetings. Instead of drawing live with graphic recording, I work in my studio to create posters. This gives the client an engaging framework and also helps them meet their goals.

A sample of highlights from 2016 include capturing a panel discussion for CBC Radio 1, engaging community members at a City of Edmonton’s open house consultation, and preparing a poster for the Elizabeth Fry Society to orient staff.

Panel Discussion with CBC Radio: live graphic recording

 

graphic recording tiare jung drawing change for cbc radio food bank forum
by Tiaré Jung for Drawing Change

CBC Radio 1 recently hosted their 30th annual food bank drive. Since 2008, food bank use in British Columbia has risen by 30%. CBC Radio hosted a panel discussion with a government representative, community members, and professionals who work in food banks, food security, and poverty reduction. The panel addressed, “how does such a wealthy province come to have 99 food banks,” and what changes would end poverty and increase quality of life for all British Columbians.

And, CBC Radio made a timelapse video:

http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/815715395560

My role was to reflect a variety of perspectives from the panelists. The moderator asked a question, I listened to the panelists respond and organized their ideas on my 7 foot by 4 foot poster. I created a visual map that follows the non-linear conversation to create transparency and understanding of a complex issue. The CBC featured my work online and in this video.

Public Consultation with City of Edmonton

graphic recording tiare jung city of edmonton coliseum
by Tiaré Jung for Drawing Change

The Coliseum in Edmonton is the former home of hockey championship games, rich with the nostalgia of the Edmonton Oilers and their victories. With a new hockey arena in Rogers Place, the Coliseum is open for repurposing. The City hosted a consultation to explore diverse community needs and desires. 

 

Tiaré Jung for Drawing Change

After participants visited different stations prompting them to imagine what the new Coliseum could be used for, they arrive at my canvas. Myself and a collaborator from the City of Edmonton asked, what is your vision for the Coliseum? We prompted community members to imagine the possibilities, and grouped their responses with other sets of common values. The graphic recording summarizes how they might use the space. When participants view the entire canvas, they can resonate with others’ ideas, or see different interests. The  image is a mural of ideas and a summary of visioning and next steps.

Elizabeth Fry Society: Training Poster, drawn in studio

graphic recording for EFry society tiare jung drawing change
by Tiaré Jung for Drawing Change

The Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver (EFry) provides support for socially excluded women and girls faced with poverty, homelessness, and addiction. To meet a gap of resources, EFry is designing a site in Surrey that will include shelters, housing, and health care services. I created this poster to interface between the women and children being served and the health care providers training to support them. The women were invited to participate in a consultation. Using the feedback they provided in the consultation, I created a poster to train and orient healthcare staff to the experiences, needs, and desires of their clients. Health care professionals have the opportunity to learn about their clients and approach their work with context and cultural sensitivity.  I featured women with brown skin and a variety of radicalized features based on the knowledge that over 1/3 of the clients are Aboriginal. The poster is a platform for those whose voices are marginalized to share stories, while protecting their confidentiality and vulnerability.

I’m excited about 2017, and what new graphic recording projects are ahead! Do you think images could help your event or project? Get in touch with Drawing Change at drawingchange.com. 

 

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